i am king of the rock

smalldisgruntledcorgi:

honestly if you dont think like, the tumblr feminist scene, with all the occasionalyl cheesy kawaii-aesthetic misandry art, hasn’t had an impact on anyone at all like

you dont remember what the average teen girl in a fandom was like before this. you don’t remember…


"Why is femslash the smallest genre in the world of fanfiction? Why is femslash the most underrepresented relationship type by a sizeable margin? More importantly, why is it that almost all femslash writers are queer women? Male slash pairings are written by straight women, queer women, and even some men (I say “even” because men are rarer than a two dollar bill in the world of fanfiction) and they’re read by a mostly female audience. Femslash has a completely different ideology, because it’s almost exclusively written and consumed by the community it portrays. Unlike a straight girl writing about two boys having sex (and I guarantee that they’re two conventionally attractive white boys whose female love interests have been deemed either worthy of death or asexual by the fandom), femslash is written by those whose identities and personal narratives are reflected in the stories themselves. Maybe the writer of that erotic scene hasn’t had sex with a girl yet, but damn, she has thought about it a lot. That queer author writes two girls falling in love even if they’re straight in the original work because two girls falling in love means something to her and to so many people like her, and it’s important that she sees herself in a piece of media whose canon forgets she exists. One of the great frustrations of LGBTQ media is the fact that so little of our representations end up coming from LGBTQ-identified creators, and thus we see inaccurate portrayals with limited diversity. Femslash exists because we were sick of being told we didn’t exist, so we wrote ourselves into their stories."
— excerpt from a very long piece I’ve been working on for autostraddle about femslash and why there’s so little of it (and why we need to make more of it NOW)

officialvoid:

pemsylvania:

inappropriate places to fall asleep. go.

insomniacs support group

#lol

"I think the question of what makes a ‘strong female character’ often goes misinterpreted. And instead we get these two-dimensional superwomen, who maybe have one quality that’s played up a lot."
- 15-year-old Tavi Gevinson, A Teen Just Trying To Figure It Out (March 2012)
#yup

timid:

I want to talk to people but I feel like I annoy every single person I talk to


"People need to be encouraged. People need to be reminded of how wonderful they are. People need to be believed in—told that they are brave and smart and capable of accomplishing all the dreams they dream and more. Remind each other of this."
— Stacey Jean Speer (via hephapimp)

gwenlightened:

ineedathneed:

watamato:

been feeling kind of paranoid lately

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Take that time by yourself to get to know yourself and rediscover what makes you shine. Don’t surrender yourself to waiting, and don’t stay isolated for too long, because there’s a beautiful you the world is dying to meet. 

comics that end sadly but wind up being replied to with love are what I live for


"

But I agree with you. It bothers me that I’m always told that I do strong female characters. When in reality, I look at my characters and I feel like they were all broken. They all came from a very devastating past. They were trying to achieve something, they had hope, and they wanted to get someplace, like everything other character that has a meaningful and relevant arc in the story.

It’s because we don’t really know women. We don’t write women accurately. We don’t see women the way that we should see women as a society, as a human race. When you see a real woman, you shouldn’t be saying she’s strong, you should be saying she’s real.

I’m not saying that Gamora is an exception, but you look at my character in Columbiana, and she’s stealthy, she’s agile, she’s physical. But even if I wasn’t physically agile, she would still carry the baggage of whatever happened in my childhood. And I handle myself in the way that I feel a woman should be. I don’t create it. It’s just something that comes natural.

So when people think they are paying me a compliment, in reality what we are saying as a society and as an art society, is that we need to focus more on the real aspect of what a woman is, and not the superficial cosmetic features of a woman as a muse to inspire us to create calendar girls. To create bombshells. To create serviceable characters, beautiful paintings of the girl with a pearl earring: if there’s nothing there behind it, it’s just her face - what’s the story?

"
— Zoe Saldana, speaking to Den of Geek. These musings in particular are so wonderfully expressed. (via pixiegrace)

"

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

"
— Libby Anne (via newwavenova)
#yup

vixens-dont-wear-pink-lipstick:

bluematchbox:

foxy-voxy:

youarethesentinels:

Lol

No, I’d say the show does a great job of representing the typical 18-34 male with Larry, with his constant need for validation, attention, and the world to revolve around him.

not to mention Bennet’s quest to prove that he’s a man, Pornstache’s overcompensation that disguises his vulnerability, Healy’s struggle to make positive change that is frustrated by his need to be loved by a woman, and Caputo’s exploration of his desire to control the world around him and whether or not he wants to do that. men are quite accurately represented in the show, the only issue male viewers seem to have is that these men display the warped nature of man’s dominance, and the idea that their superiority is not perfect and noble is offensive.

^^^^^^

vixens-dont-wear-pink-lipstick:

bluematchbox:

foxy-voxy:

youarethesentinels:

Lol

No, I’d say the show does a great job of representing the typical 18-34 male with Larry, with his constant need for validation, attention, and the world to revolve around him.

not to mention Bennet’s quest to prove that he’s a man, Pornstache’s overcompensation that disguises his vulnerability, Healy’s struggle to make positive change that is frustrated by his need to be loved by a woman, and Caputo’s exploration of his desire to control the world around him and whether or not he wants to do that.

men are quite accurately represented in the show, the only issue male viewers seem to have is that these men display the warped nature of man’s dominance, and the idea that their superiority is not perfect and noble is offensive.

^^^^^^